MTA Developers Unconference

Just got home from the first MTA Developers Unconference.  I had the honor of speaking on the panel, which was moderated by Anil Dash and included some really great folks: MTA Chairman Jay Walder, Deputy US CTO for Open Government Beth Noveck, Derek Gotfrid from the NY Times, Anthony Shorris from the Rudin Center, and Read more…

Held hostage

There’s a nice post from David Eaves today on the need for a “MuniForge” — a repository for open source municipal software.  Without getting too into the details, I wanted to point out one line that really struck a chord with me, discussing the conundrum that governments find themselves in when procuring proprietary software: …most Read more…

Living Plans

At last night’s PlanningTech workshop, we diagrammed out planning processes to see where the insertion of technology might have been helpful.  The processes we looked at ranged from seemingly simple (getting a bike rack installed on your street) to massively complex (advocating for funding for MTA’s capital plan). Keep an eye out for digitized versions Read more…

Text-to-voice

On their blog today, Mobile Commons explains how AARP used text-to-voice to mobilize senior citizens around health care reform. It’s not news that mobile (and particularly phone and sms) are the tech tools that connect with the widest audience, but I’m continually impressed by the way that Mobile Commons has built a platform that makes Read more…

TransparencyCamp Quick Hits

Recently Phil Ashlock and I headed down to DC to participate in TransparencyCamp, a BarCamp event put on by the Sunlight Foundation.  We spent two days with ~200 open government and transparency advocates from all sectors — government, non-profit, tech, etc.  All in all, it was a pretty amazing event — great people and good Read more…

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